Bernar Venet - The dot hypothesis engravings

Bernar Venet, in Hypotheses of Dots, offers a rare work, all the more exceptional because his engraved works are as yet uncommon.

 

Considered as one of the key figures of conceptual art, Bernar Venet continually renews his practice, opening towards new fields of experimentation.

After emphasizing the fact that his art reposes on performances (that are less well known by the general public), and reconsidering his relationship with painting (through series of mathematical equations he began in 2001), he is now working on the vocabulary of his sculpture by moving form the Line to these series of “Dots”.

These works – cut out of steel with a blowtorch – are presented in a constellation on walls. In this manner, Bernar Venet questions the principles of chance while defining heterogeneous spaces that can be read as both three-dimensional sculptures and frontal planes with infinite dimensions.

He has just created an important breakthrough with a series of three engravings that illustrate this principle for Bernard Chauveau publishing and Néant publishing. This exceptional triptych (225 x 105 cm) also offers establishes a tension between the precision of his practice and the sensuality of his prints on copper plates.

By playing with texture and the white of the paper, and by the subtle inking from light grey to dense black, Bernar Venet gives the work a monumental, intimate character. The mass of Dots converse with their own subtle traces and shifting movements. Bernar Venet, in Hypotheses of Dots, offers a rare work, all the more exceptional because his engraved works are as yet uncommon.

Reference Venet gravures
Size 105 x 75 cm
Edition 20 copies
Justification Signed and numbered
Technique Three engravings Prints on BFK Rives 270 g paper
Publication date 2014

Venet (Bernar)


Bernar Venet (born in 1941 in France) is a visual artist. In 1958, he joined the Villa Thiole in Nice and then became assistant set designer at the Opera of Nice. In 1966, he moved to New York where he painted and sculpted mostly wood and steel. His steel sculptures (or “Indeterminate Lines”) were exhibited in many urban spaces across France and worldwide.

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